Friday Afternoons

Founded in 2013 and inspired by Benjamin Britten, Friday Afternoons is an international initiative encouraging young people to sing.

The Friday Afternoons initiative began as part of the celebrations for Benjamin Britten’s centenary. What was initially just a Suffolk project became regional, then national, then global, and on Friday, 22 November 2013, there were close to 70,000 young people from around the world singing one or more of Britten’s songs.

Friday Afternoons now commissions new repertoire every year for children’s voices, with a whole host of resources available for free on the website, including teaching and accessibility resources to help as many people as possible engage with the songs.

The project’s ever-growing Song Bank contains new music and support material to help teachers develop their students’ skills – as performers, listeners and composers.

For 2017, Luke Styles worked alongside librettist Alan McKendrick on 12 new songs for the Friday Afternoons Song Bank. Eight of the songs were written by the composer and librettist, with four additional songs being created in collaboration with groups of young people across the country. These groups are: Elgol Primary School and Bun-sgoil Shlèite, Isle of Skye; Thomas Wolsey School, Ipswich; Netley Primary School, London; and students from Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.

  • To encourage young people to sing;
  • To build a Song Bank and support material to help teachers develop their students’ skills as performers, listeners and composers.
  • Arts Council England
  • The Bernarr Rainbow Trust
  • The Boltini Trust
  • The Garfield Weston Foundation
  • The Sackler Trust
  • The Doric Charitable Trust

Visited 352 times, 1 Visit today

Tagged In benjamin britten,england,singing,snape maltings and uk & ireland

Add a Review

Your Rating for this listing:

Related Listings

Sistema Scotland

Sistema Scotland

The Raploch Community Campus, Drip Road, Stirling, United Kingdom

A full list of supporters can be found on page 2 of Sistema Scotland's brochure

  • Big Noise Raploch, Stirling, was established in 2008 and currently engages with almost 500 children and young people
  • Big Noise Govanhill, Glasgow, was established in 2013 and currently engages with almost 800 children
  • Big Noise Torry, Aberdeen, was established in 2015 and currently engages with almost 500 children
  • A typical Big Noise child can be involved in the programme for up to 11 hours a week, 45 weeks each year. That means almost 500 hours of intervention and support a year.

'Sistema Scotland’s Big Noise programme has the potential to significantly enhance participants’ lives, prospects, health and wellbeing through a variety of identified pathways in the long-term. [...] While Big Noise can appear to the casual observer to be like many other arts or music programmes, we encountered a number of factors which, when taken together, potentially make it unique – including its ambition, longevity, intensity and inclusivity.' - Professor Carol Tannahill, Director of the Glasgow Centre for Population Health

'(Child’s Name) can be hard to manage when he’s in my class. But the difference when a Big Noise musician came in! Because it was something he could do, you could just see in his eyes. …Being taught on the violin, he was just so proud of what he could do. That’s a child that stands out in my head for the impact there can be, on a child who’s very hard to reach, in many ways.' - Primary school teacher, Govanhill

'I have never seen a piece of work come into an area, target so many people and have such an impact in such a short period of time.' - NHS Manager, Glasgow

  • To transform children’s lives
  • To empower communities
  • To create a sustainable charity, with permanent benefits

Scotland

Founded in 2013 and inspired by Benjamin Britten, Friday Afternoons is an international initiative encouraging young people to sing.

The Friday Afternoons initiative began as part of the celebrations for Benjamin Britten’s centenary. What was initially just a Suffolk project became regional, then national, then global, and on Friday, 22 November 2013, there were close to 70,000 young people from around the world singing one or more of Britten’s songs.

Friday Afternoons now commissions new repertoire every year for children’s voices, with a whole host of resources available for free on the website, including teaching and accessibility resources to help as many people as possible engage with the songs.

The project’s ever-growing Song Bank contains new music and support material to help teachers develop their students’ skills – as performers, listeners and composers.

For 2017, Luke Styles worked alongside librettist Alan McKendrick on 12 new songs for the Friday Afternoons Song Bank. Eight of the songs were written by the composer and librettist, with four additional songs being created in collaboration with groups of young people across the country. These groups are: Elgol Primary School and Bun-sgoil Shlèite, Isle of Skye; Thomas Wolsey School, Ipswich; Netley Primary School, London; and students from Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.

Posted In  Education

NYMAZ

NYMAZ

Clements Hall, Nunthorpe Road, York YO23 1BW, United Kingdom

  • Youth Music
  • Accessible Arts & Media
  • Army Welfare Service
  • Arts Council England
  • Blue Boxt Productions
  • Create Arts Development
  • Dales Jam
  • Digital R&D Fund for the Arts
  • Harrogate Area Home Education Group
  • Harrogate International Festivals
  • Live Music Now
  • Musinc
  • Musicport Festival
  • North Yorkshire County Council
  • North Yorkshire Music Hub
  • Primary Music Network
  • Richmond Jazz Festival 
  • Skipton Extended Learning for All
  • Songwires

In 2016:

  • NYMAZ successfully worked with 2500 children and young people in North Yorkshire.
  • 262 workshops and 48 performances were given in 49 locations across the country. 
  • NYMAZ's membership network grew by 23%.
  • 48 CPD activities were given and 246 individuals were trained.

  • 'It brings together lots of different ages and abilities and allows people to learn off each other.'
  • 'Richmond Jam is a great stepping stone into being a great musician and teaches you a lot about rehearsing and experience being in a band.'
  • As a parent, I can't think of a safer or more inspirational place for young musicians to experiment and develop their skills.'
  • The professional development course has given me confidence to go back to work and explain to staff the huge importance of music in the early years.'
  • 'The CPD opportunities keep me inspired and help me to refresh and improve my current practice.'

  • To provide bespoke high quality music outreach activities in a variety of in, and out-of-school settings across North Yorkshire.
  • To deliver anything from inspirational one-off workshops to longer-term creative projects incorporating staff training, tailored to the particular needs of a given organisation and the age and ability of the children and young people it works with.
  • To work with trusted partner organisations to ensure that young residents have the same life chances as those living in more populated areas.
  • To raise aspirations, develop personal and social skills and enhance career prospects, as well as improving musical ability.
  • To establish professional networks and enable musicians and practitioners to develop their skills, share best practice and network with peers, across a range of specialist sectors.

Yorkshire and Humberside

Founded in 2013 and inspired by Benjamin Britten, Friday Afternoons is an international initiative encouraging young people to sing.

The Friday Afternoons initiative began as part of the celebrations for Benjamin Britten’s centenary. What was initially just a Suffolk project became regional, then national, then global, and on Friday, 22 November 2013, there were close to 70,000 young people from around the world singing one or more of Britten’s songs.

Friday Afternoons now commissions new repertoire every year for children’s voices, with a whole host of resources available for free on the website, including teaching and accessibility resources to help as many people as possible engage with the songs.

The project’s ever-growing Song Bank contains new music and support material to help teachers develop their students’ skills – as performers, listeners and composers.

For 2017, Luke Styles worked alongside librettist Alan McKendrick on 12 new songs for the Friday Afternoons Song Bank. Eight of the songs were written by the composer and librettist, with four additional songs being created in collaboration with groups of young people across the country. These groups are: Elgol Primary School and Bun-sgoil Shlèite, Isle of Skye; Thomas Wolsey School, Ipswich; Netley Primary School, London; and students from Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.

Posted In  Education

The I Speak Music project

I Speak Music

Surrey Music Hub, Westfield Primary School, Bonsey Lane, Kingfield, Woking GU22 9PR, UK

Youth Music

  • "When I came to this country it was a bit strange to me, it didn't feel very comfortable to be in a new place, new language and meeting new people, going back to square one. Meeting people like Jim [Pinchen, project manager] made such a difference in my life - I think everyone feels the same when they come and take part in this project. They feel welcome and feel like they can play a part" - Rajhad Haddad, violist, I Speak Music Community Orchestra
  • "What I love about it is the diversity of the group and the fact that, whenever we have a rehearsal, everyone comes not quite knowing what's going to happen, not quite confident, slightly insecure, and some of them come from quite a solitary place. By the end of the rehearsal the energy of the music has really solidified everyone together - it's a beautiful energetic experience." - Sara Khoroosi, freelance musician, Surrey Arts worker

  • To bring together professionals and community groups who work with, or have an interest in supporting newly arrived and vulnerable young people through the arts and music.
  • To deliver song writing taster workshops, music workshops, and a celebration concert of participants' experience.
  • To develop the musical skills and build the self-confidence of the young musicians.
  • To allow tutors, supporters and project partners to also grow through this experience by gaining a better understanding of the challenges these young people face and grow in confidence in engaging with them.
  • To inspire participants to join and progress onto other Surrey Arts ensembles and groups.
  • To continue to develop what they have learned and explore music genres after the project ends.

South-East England

2018-12-24

2018-04-02

Founded in 2013 and inspired by Benjamin Britten, Friday Afternoons is an international initiative encouraging young people to sing.

The Friday Afternoons initiative began as part of the celebrations for Benjamin Britten’s centenary. What was initially just a Suffolk project became regional, then national, then global, and on Friday, 22 November 2013, there were close to 70,000 young people from around the world singing one or more of Britten’s songs.

Friday Afternoons now commissions new repertoire every year for children’s voices, with a whole host of resources available for free on the website, including teaching and accessibility resources to help as many people as possible engage with the songs.

The project’s ever-growing Song Bank contains new music and support material to help teachers develop their students’ skills – as performers, listeners and composers.

For 2017, Luke Styles worked alongside librettist Alan McKendrick on 12 new songs for the Friday Afternoons Song Bank. Eight of the songs were written by the composer and librettist, with four additional songs being created in collaboration with groups of young people across the country. These groups are: Elgol Primary School and Bun-sgoil Shlèite, Isle of Skye; Thomas Wolsey School, Ipswich; Netley Primary School, London; and students from Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.

Posted In  Outreach and  Vocal/instrumental learning/teaching